Bandages for wounds with foreign body - First Aid

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First aid

First aid

Practical guide to first aid

Airway opening control Artificial respiration Mouth-mouth respiration Mouth-nose respiration Cardiac massage Combination of ventilation with cardiac massage Mushroom poisoning Poisoning by altered or infected food Poisoning by ingestion of toxic substances Gas poisoning External bleeding Internal bleeding Simple wounds and grazes Serious wounds Chest wounds Abdomen wounds Face wounds How to make a bandage Bandages for foreign body wounds Limb fractures Column fractures Head injuries Acute cramp Heat stroke Burns Serious burns Mild burns Caustic burns Hypothermia Hypothermia in children Freezing Electrocution Foreign bodies in the airways Foreign bodies in the ear Otorrhagia Foreign bodies in the eye Eye injuries Snake bites Bites of other animals Insect bites Resuscitation maneuvers Artificial respiration Cardiac massage Loss of consciousness Convu Suffocation
  • Airway opening control
  • Artificial breathing
  • Mouth-to-mouth breathing
  • Mouth-nose breathing
  • Cardiac massage
  • Combination of ventilation with cardiac massage
  • Mushroom poisoning
  • Intoxication by altered or infected food
  • Poisoning by ingestion of toxic substances
  • Gas poisoning
  • External bleeding
  • Internal bleeding
  • Simple wounds and grazes
  • Serious injuries
  • Chest wounds
  • Wounds in the abdomen
  • Wounds to the face
  • How to make a bandage
  • Bandages for wounds with foreign body
    • What to do
    • What to do
  • Limb fractures
  • Column fractures
  • Head injuries
  • Acute cramp
  • Heat stroke
  • Burns
  • Severe burns
  • Mild burns
  • Caustic caustic burns
  • Hypothermia
  • Hypothermia in children
  • Freezing
  • electrocution
  • Foreign bodies in the airways
  • Foreign bodies in the ear
  • otorrhagia
  • Foreign bodies in the eye
  • Injury to the eye
  • Snake bites
  • Bites of other animals
  • Insect bites
  • Resuscitation maneuvers
  • Artificial breathing
  • Cardiac massage
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Convulsions
  • Suffocation

Bandages for wounds with foreign body

When a foreign body (of any nature) sticks deep into the wound (Figure 1), attempting to pull it out could cause further damage.

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What to do

  1. Take any piece of fabric and fold it up to obtain a thin band (Figure 2).
  2. Form a large ring around the palm of your hand, leaving your thumb free (Figure 3).

3. Roll gauze around the perimeter of the ring and secure the ends well (Figure 4).

4. The previously obtained ring swab can now be easily placed on the wound without touching the foreign body (Figure 5).

5. Secure the pad with a few turns of bandage (Figure 6), then proceed to bandage taking care not to compress the foreign body. Finally cover the bandage with gauze held in place by patches (Figure 7).

They are the consequence of a trauma (direct or indirect) that affects bones or joints. The symptoms of the two conditions are often similar, therefore, since the fracture represents the most serious of the two diseases, in case of uncertainty it is necessary to intervene as if we were faced with a situation of this type. In fractures, in fact, the continuity of a bone structure is interrupted, while in dislocation, the bone heads, normally in contact in the joint.

Fractures are defined as exposed or internal (unexposed). In the first case, the bone fragments cause an injury to the muscles and the overlying skin: the fracture will therefore be complicated by the presence of a more or less serious wound. Any deformation of the affected limb indicates the displacement of the bone or parts of it.

Fracture symptoms are listed below:

  • very severe pain;
  • inability to use the limb;
  • swelling;
  • bruising;
  • deformation of the affected limb;
  • possible confusional state or loss of consciousness.

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What to do

  1. Avoid moving the accident unless you are in a situation of real danger, especially if you suspect a fracture in the back or neck; prevent him from getting up or using the affected part.
  2. Make sure at once that the subject is conscious and that he is breathing; at this point, prepare to face any respiratory and circulatory problems, practicing artificial respiration or cardiac massage, if the situation requires it.
  3. If the fracture is exposed, it is necessary to protect the lesion from contamination by external agents and try to stop any bleeding.
  4. Provide to immobilize the affected part and, if it is a limb, lift it gently. This operation serves to decrease blood flow in the area and to relieve pain and swelling.
  5. Put into practice measures to prevent the subject from falling into a confusional state or from losing consciousness. Transport to the hospital must be carried out for any type of fracture; it is essential, however, that it occurs in appropriate conditions, so do not hesitate to call the ambulance.
  6. In this regard, it must be remembered that the suffering caused by incorrect maneuvers is one of the triggers of the state of shock, so, in the event of a fracture in the lower limbs, it is advisable not to immobilize the injured person with improper means, but to intervene with adequate transport systems.

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