The evolution of the discipline - Craniosacral

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Craniosacral

Craniosacral

Craniosacral

The origins The evolution of the discipline The craniosacral mechanism Cranial and craniosacral osteopathy Effects on the organism Mechanism of action The craniosacral session
  • The origins
  • The evolution of the discipline
  • The craniosacral mechanism
  • Cranial and craniosacral osteopathy
  • Effects on the organism
  • Mechanism of action
  • The craniosacral session

The evolution of the discipline

The clinical experience, the discoveries and intuitions that Sutherland developed in more than 30 years describe well what represents a path and an evolution of craniosacral work.

Until the end of its existence, Sutherland used many modalities to describe the movements of the primary respiratory mechanism: he spoke of waves and tides, of liquid light, of spark that ignites the engine of primary respiration, of Power (with a capital P) of the fluids at the inside the fluids.

These metaphors, imbued with biblical language, are still used by craniosacral operators to describe something subtle, perceptible only in conditions of deep meditative listening, which is however palpable and allows the operator to get in touch with the force that governs in general our whole existence.

Sutherland, having detected the rhythmic harmony between the cranial bones and the sacrum (subjected to the wave produced by the fluctuation of the liquor that is reflected all over the body), observed that this movement includes a phase of expansion and flattening of the system (called flexion ) and another of contraction and lengthening (called extension), just as it happens for breathing; both phases are guided by a sort of inherent fluctuation of the liquor.

At the end of the bending phase, the tension created by the dural membrane system (called by Sutherland mutual tension membranes) causes the next extension phase, and so on.

The discoveries of Sutherland allow to combine his concept of breath of life with the subtle energy that ancient traditional Chinese medicine calls Chi or Qi, the Japanese call Ki and the Indians Prana: it is interesting to note how the first term is translated just as " breath ", in full harmony with the thought of Sutherland.

Starting from the seventies of the twentieth century, this experience of palpation through very slow movements, which pass through the human body and are an expression of vital health forces, is called craniosacral and also spreads beyond the borders of osteopathy, first in America (thanks especially to the work of John Upledger) then in Europe (with the contribution, among others, of the Englishman Franklyn Sills).

Today this bio-natural discipline is widely spread and appreciated for its multiple applications, which aim to improve the well-being and health of the person.

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