Foot and hand care - Dermatology and aesthetics

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Dermatology and aesthetics

Dermatology and aesthetics

Foot and hand care

The hands The feet
  • The hands
  • The feet

The hands are the part of the body that we use most often, they are almost always in sight and put us in relationship with others and with the world around us. Exposed to atmospheric agents and subjected to the aggression of detergents and detergents, the hands show the age of the registry more than other parts of the body, for this reason keeping them beautiful and cared for can be important in relationship life and in working relationships.

Equally important for our well-being are the feet which, exposed to the constriction of shoes and particularly sensitive to summer heat, dehydration, swelling and circulatory difficulties, must not be overlooked: these ends in fact support the body and provide it with support during walking, therefore keeping them healthy, well cared for and efficient is useful, as well as for aesthetic reasons, for the health of the organism.

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The hands

Our hands are the first contact with the outside world, consequently they are constantly exposed to air, atmospheric agents, environmental pollutants, dirt and infections; some manual works then, in particular those that involve frequent contact with water and detergents, pose serious dangers due to their beauty. It is therefore advisable to follow some small hygienic and aesthetic measures to contribute to the improvement and maintenance of the health of this part of the body. When washing your hands, especially if this happens frequently, you should choose neutral or acidic pH cleaners (the pH of the skin is acidic); in the presence of well-defined dermatological pathologies, it is essential to follow the specific indications of the dermatologist. In subjects with atopic dermatitis or irritative contact dermatitis, for example, the integrity of the skin barrier is severely compromised: this makes it necessary to use detergents based on non-aggressive surfactants, under suitable dermatological indications; in the case of allergic contact dermatitis, however, it is necessary to use products whose composition is certainly absent from the allergenic substance (s), for example perfumes, dyes and preservatives, too often added to widely used cosmetics.

At least once a day it would be advisable to massage the hands with an emollient cream, capable of restoring the conditions of physiological hydration of the skin. There are, for this purpose, numerous lipid-based products similar to those of the skin (phospholipids, ceramides, squalene and triglycerides) that would have the function (not fully demonstrated, in reality) of attracting water from the deepest layers of the epidemide and from the dermis, and thus reconstitute the lipid barrier. In many moisturizers there are also protective substances, such as screens and sunscreens, capable of preventing and delaying the photoaging effect to which the hands are naturally subjected. Finally, there are cosmetic products formulated as real barrier creams (a sort of "invisible gloves"), able to protect the skin from irritants and to hinder, for example, the mechanisms from which the immune reactions triggering allergic dermatitis originate. Barrier creams take on particular importance in some categories of subjects most exposed to the risk of damage to the skin of the hands, i.e. housewives, healthcare personnel or anyone who carries out an intense manual activity, perhaps in repeated or continuous contact with highly irritating substances (mechanical, unskilled workers, plumbers, bricklayers, painters, etc.) and need repeated hand washing.

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