First aid

Anonim

First aid

First aid

Emergency intervention in children

Sunburn in children Diaper rash Febrile seizures The child who does not sleep Acute asthma access Dental trauma Head injury
  • Sunburn in the child
    • Why expose your child to the sun with caution
    • How to expose the child to the sun without making him take risks
    • What to do
    • When to seek medical attention
  • Diaper rash
  • Febrile seizures
  • The child who does not sleep
  • Acute asthma access
  • Dental trauma
  • Head trauma

Sunburn in the child

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Why expose your child to the sun with caution

Children are more sensitive to sun exposure: those with a light skin type are at greater risk, but children with dark skin can burn themselves if exposed in an imprudent way. The sun's rays are stronger between 10 and 16, in the mountains and in the tropics. Water and sand at the sea and snow in the mountains, reflecting the sun's rays, intensify them. Some medications can increase the risk of sunburn (certain antibiotics) or cause photo-sensitivity reactions (antihistamines in cream).

Serious reactions to sun exposure (heat stroke) are manifested by high fever, chills, dizziness, nausea, vomiting.

Sun rays cause premature aging of the skin. Skin tumors often occur in adulthood, but are also caused by the imprudent solar positions of childhood. Sunburns before the age of 12 are in fact "memorized" by the skin and favor the onset of skin tumors in adulthood.

The prudent attitudes necessary to avoid damaging the baby's skin often collide with the desire to go home tanned and to enjoy the maximum of the few days of vacation available. It is dangerous for the baby's skin, however, not to respect the time needed to build a natural tan. You can enjoy the benefits of a seaside or mountain holiday even by letting the child play in the sun only in the hours of minimum intensity of the sun's rays and by using the other hours for rest, for meals, for playing in tree-lined areas.

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How to expose the child to the sun without making him take risks

You must first avoid exposing it to the sun during the hours of maximum intensity of the sun's rays. The exposure must be gradual (one hour at most on the first day), gradually increasing the exposure time in the following days.

This allows the skin to implement its natural defense mechanisms. In this way, within a week, the child tans naturally and this will represent for him the best defense mechanism, more effective than any artificial filter or barrier. Have the child wear a hat and sunglasses.

Filters and sunscreens are an aid but cannot replace natural defenses. Therefore, do not use them to prolong the sun exposure too much. It is preferable to use medium protection filters or screens by applying them very often. The child is likely to accept a suntan milk better, easier to spread than a cream; apply it at home, before going out, and always reapply it after the child has taken a bath or if you wash it because it got dirty.

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What to do

Wet the skin with fresh or lukewarm water, depending on the child's preferences (in the bath or in the shower). You can also apply wet cloths to the skin with fresh water, replacing them every 10 minutes. An aloe gel can be applied to reduce pain and inflammation. If the pain is very intense and fever is present, it is possible to give the child paracetamol or ibuprofen at the usual doses recommended by the pediatrician.

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When to seek medical attention

It is necessary to go to the doctor immediately if the child is confused, dizzy, breathes quickly, is pale, has nausea, chills, vomiting or fever and if he has sunburn with blisters or very painful blisters.

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